244
UNIT TWO
31
Match the parts listed on the left with the bones listed on
the right. (pp. 208–236)
(1)
Coronoid process
A. Ethmoid bone
(2)
Cribriform plate
B.
Frontal bone
(3)
Foramen magnum
C. Mandible
(4)
Mastoid process
D. Maxillary bone
(5)
Palatine process
E.
Occipital bone
(6)
Sella turcica
F.
Temporal bone
(7)
Supraorbital notch
G. Sphenoid bone
(8)
Temporal process
H. Zygomatic bone
(9)
Acromion process
I.
Femur
(10) Deltoid tuberosity
J.
Fibula
(11) Greater trochanter
K. Humerus
(12) Lateral malleolus
L. Radius
(13) Medial malleolus
M. Scapula
(14) Olecranon process
N. Sternum
(15) Radial tuberosity
O. Tibia
(16) Xiphoid process
P.
Ulna
7.13 Life-Span Changes
32
Describe the changes, brought about by aging, in
trabecular bone. (p. 240)
33
List factors that may preserve skeletal health. (p. 240)
7.6 Skull–7.12 Lower Limb
21
Name the bones of the cranium and the facial skeleton.
(p. 208)
22
Explain the importance of fontanels. (p. 216)
23
Describe a typical vertebra, and distinguish among the
cervical, thoracic, and lumbar vertebrae. (p. 219)
24
Describe the locations of the sacroiliac joint, the sacral
promontory, and the sacral hiatus. (p. 222)
25
Name the bones that comprise the thoracic cage. (p. 222)
26
The clavicle and scapula form the ________________
girdle, whereas the hip bones and sacrum form the
__________________ girdle. (p. 225)
27
Name the bones of the upper limb, and describe their
locations. (p. 226)
28
Name the bones that comprise the hip bone. (p. 231)
29
Explain the major di±
erences between the male and
female skeletons. (p. 234)
30
Name the bones of the lower limb, and describe their
locations. (p. 234)
OUTCOMES 1.6, 7.3, 7.4, 7.6
1. How might the condition of an infant’s fontanels be used to
evaluate skeletal development?
How might the fontanels be
used to estimate intracranial pressure (pressure in the cranial
cavity)?
OUTCOMES 1.8, 7.2, 7.3
2. Why are incomplete, longitudinal fractures of bone shafts
(greenstick fractures) more common in children than in adults?
OUTCOMES 5.3, 7.2, 7.6
3. How does the structure of a bone make it strong yet lightweight?
OUTCOMES 5.3, 7.3
4. If a young patient’s forearm and elbow are immobilized by a
cast for several weeks, what changes would you expect to occur
in the bones of the upper limb?
OUTCOMES 7.3, 7.4, 7.10, 7.12
5. When a child’s bone is fractured, growth may be stimulated at
the epiphyseal plate. What problems might this extra growth
INTEGRATIVE ASSESSMENTS/CRITICAL THINKING
cause in an upper or lower limb before the growth of the other
limb compensates for the difference in length?
OUTCOMES 7.3, 7.11, 7.13
6. Archeologists discover skeletal remains of humanlike
animals in Ethiopia. Examination of the bones suggests that
the remains represent four types of individuals. Two of the
skeletons have bone densities 30% less than those of the
other two skeletons. The skeletons with the lower bone mass
also have broader front pelvic bones. Within the two groups
deF
ned by bone mass, smaller skeletons have bones with
evidence of epiphyseal plates, but larger bones have only a
thin line where the epiphyseal plates should be.
Give the age
group and gender of the individuals in this F
nd.
OUTCOMES 7.7, 7.13
7. Why do elderly persons often develop bowed backs and
appear to lose height?
Anatomy & Physiology Revealed® (APR)
includes cadaver photos that allow you
to peel away layers of the human body to
reveal structures beneath the surface. This program also includes
animations, radiologic imaging, audio pronunciations, and practice
quizzing. Check out
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. APR has been proven
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WEB CONNECTIONS
Be sure to visit the text website at
www.mhhe.com/shier12
for
answers to chapter assessments, additional quizzes, and interactive
learning exercises.
ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY REVEALED
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